Date and time

27th February 2021 (Sat) 15:30~17:30

*Online event (zoom)

*Please register from the below link. The details will be sent to you via email.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf8vdLJgd20f6QR9Y5GAupIiP_Ye2eXKnIHwiPgiF4j6HIIfg/viewform?usp=sf_link

Speaker

Prof. Shoko MIZUNO (Faculty of Economics, Komazawa University)

Program

15:30-15:35 Introduction

15:35-16:35

“Hybrid Forestry Practices in British Colonial and Postcolonial Forestry Networks”by Prof. Shoko MIZUNO (Komazawa University)

16:35-16:45 Tea break

16:45-16:55 Comments by the discussant

Discussant: Prof. Rohan D’Souza (Kyoto University)

16:55-17:30 Discussion

Abstract

This study first examined the process by which the forest management system was developed in the British Empire, focusing on colonial foresters’ arguments concerning the question of indigenous land use. This study argued that by the early 20th century, new forestry practices called the ‘taungya’ and ‘village forest’ had been devised to manage indigenous land use, such as shifting cultivation in colonial sites. These ‘hybrid’ forestry practices, which evolved from encounters between European forestry models and indigenous land use in colonial regions, were incorporated into empire forestry networks. Study findings reveal how the hybrid colonial forestry practices were argued in multiple forestry networks after World War II. This was accomplished by considering the continuity and shifts in the postcolonial forestry networks, by examining the arguments, for and against the taungya, from the late 1940s to 1960s. The Empire/Commonwealth Forestry Conference, and the World Forestry Congress were analysed primarily to explore how foresters of newly independent countries, former colonial British foresters, and other experts committed to international technical assistance, considered this issue.

Speaker bio

Shoko Mizuno is a Professor in Economic History at Komazawa University. Her research uses historical methods to investigate how environmental ideas and practices were generated and developed in Britain’s tropical colonies. She also explores how colonial knowledge was circulated and reconstructed in the imperial and international scientific networks. Mizuno is the author of  Colonial Scientists in the Ecological Century: Development, Environment and the British Empire, Nagoya: Nagoyadaigakusyuppankai, 2020(水野祥子『エコロジーの世紀と植民地科学者―イギリス帝国・開発・環境』名古屋大学出版会) and Environmental History of the British Empire: Forestry and Colonial India, Tokyo: Iwanamishoten, 2006 (水野祥子『イギリス帝国からみる環境史―インド支配と森林保護』岩波書店). Her ongoing research examines the legacies of colonial knowledge and forestry practices in the British Empire, particularly in British India, and investigates their reinforcement or transformation in the postcolonial period.